Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) seroprevalence in population-based samples of African children: evidence for at least 2 patterns of KSHV transmission.

Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) seroprevalence in population-based samples of African children: evidence for at least 2 patterns of KSHV transmission.

Fecha de publicación online: 01/08/2009

Abstract:

Background. Kaposi sarcoma–associated herpesvirus (KSHV) infection is endemic among adult populations
in Africa. A prevailing view is that childhood transmission is primarily responsible for the high seroprevalence of
KSHV among adults that is observed throughout the continent. However, few studies have directly examined
children, particularly in locations where KS is not commonly endemic.
Methods. Participants were children aged 1.5–8.9 years, including 427 children from a population-based sample
in South Africa, 422 from a population-based sample in Uganda, and 567 from a clinic-based sample in Uganda.
All serum specimens were tested by the same laboratory for KSHV antibodies with use of 2 enzyme immunoassays
(against K8.1 and ORF65) and 1 immunofluorescence assay.
Results. KSHV seroprevalence was 7.5%–9.0% among South African children and was not associated with
age. In contrast, in the Ugandan population-based sample, KSHV seroprevalence increased from 10% among 2-
year-old children to 30.6% among 8-year-old children (P ! .001). In the Ugandan clinic-based sample, sero- trend
prevalence increased from 9.3% among 2-year-old children to 36.4% among 8-year-old children (P ! .001). trend
Conclusion. Two distinct relationships between age and KSHV infection among children imply that KSHV
transmission among children is not uniform throughout Africa and is therefore not always responsible for the
high seroprevalence observed in adults. There are at least 2 patterns of KSHV transmission in Africa.

Autores: Butler, L.M., G. Dorsey, W. Hladik, P.J. Rosenthal, C. Brander, T.B. Neilands, G. Mbisa, D. Whitby, P. Kiepiela, A. Mosam, S. Mzolo, S.C. Dollard, and J.N. Martin
  • Código Doi: J Infect Dis 200:430-438.

Suscríbete a la newsletter

Back to Top
Irsi Caixa

Impulsado por:

Fundación 'La Caixa' Generalitat de Catalunya - Departament de Salut

 

HR Excellence in Research

Miembro de:

Cerca

Con la colaboración de: